European forest types for biodiversity assessment - Quantitative approaches

M.M. Norddahl-Kirsch, R.H.W. Bradshaw

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference article in proceedingspeer-review

Abstract

Future monitoring of European forests and their biodiversity is most logically based onquantitative surveys and it is practical if existing survey systems are modified for this purpose. We analyse quantitative data from two different types of survey that cover most of Europe: 1) National forest inventories and 2) ICP Forests Level 1 data. National forest inventory data were pooled at the scale of regional administrative units to generate a relatively homogeneous data set of percentage tree species composition. These data were
classified using clustering routines to generate a set of major European forest types. The quantitative approach is considerably influenced by plantations of limited biodiversity and has difficulty resolving rare forest types of high diversity (e.g. floodplain forests), so a combination of approaches is desirable to faithfully describe European forest biodiversity.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMonitoring and indicators of forest biodiversity in Europe – from ideas to operationality
EditorsMarco Marchetti
PublisherEuropean Forest Institute
Pages135-142
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)952-5453-05-7
ISBN (Print)952-5453-04-9
Publication statusPublished - 31 Aug 2004
EventMonitoring and Indicators of Forest Biodiversity in Europe - from ideas to operationality - Firenze, Italy
Duration: 12 Nov 200315 Nov 2003

Publication series

NameEuropean Forest Institute Proceedings
PublisherEuropean Forest Institute
Volume51
ISSN (Print)1237-8801

Conference

ConferenceMonitoring and Indicators of Forest Biodiversity in Europe - from ideas to operationality
CityFirenze, Italy
Period12/11/0315/11/03

Programme Area

  • Programme Area 5: Nature and Climate

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