Architecture of glaciotectonic complexes

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    40 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Glaciotectonic studies are an integrated part of the Quaternary geological research carried out by the Danish geological survey. Almost all the hilly areas in Denmark were created or affected by glaciotectonic deformations, and the features are included in the mapping of surface near deposits. For the mapping and support of constructing 3D geological models a classification of architecture of glaciotectonic complexes is suggested. The important elements for classification of architecture are the surfaces. Four orders of surfaces are defined for glaciotectonic complexes: first-order surfaces are décollement surfaces and glaciotectonic unconformities; second-order surfaces are ramps and flats—the thrust faults; third-order surfaces are folded beds—anticlines and synclines; and fourth-order surfaces are small scale folds and faults—kink bands, conjugate faults, box folds, etc. The most important first-order surface is the décollement surface. This surface limits the glaciotectonic complex at its base and controls the extent of glaciotectonic disturbances. Below this surface, ordinary flat lying planar bedding occurs, whereas above the surface a number of structures are present characteristic of second-to fourth-order elements in the glaciotectonic architecture. The other first-order surface is the topographic top of the glaciotectonic complex, which eventually may be replaced by a truncating unconformity.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)269-296
    Number of pages28
    JournalGeosciences (Switzerland)
    Volume4
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 16 Oct 2014

    Keywords

    • Deformation of sediments
    • Geological architecture
    • Glaciotectonics
    • Structural complexes
    • Tin-skinned thrust-fault tectonics

    Programme Area

    • Programme Area 5: Nature and Climate

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