Cryo History - How airborne glaciologists measured the movement of glaciers before the satellite era

Publikation: Working paper eller internetudgivelseInternetpublikationFormidling

Abstrakt

Recent work published in my department at the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS) focused on solid ice discharge into the ocean from the Greenland Ice Sheet from 1986 to 2017 (Mankoff et al. 2019). Solid ice discharge is the ice that is lost from a glacier as it flows towards the coast and eventually breaks off as icebergs into the ocean (i.e. calving). Solid ice discharge is an important constraint for sea level rise predictions. Today, we use satellite observations and available models. However, during the pre-satellite era, ice discharge had to be evaluated very differently. Read on to learn about what was done during the Expédition Glaciologique Internationale Au Groenland 1957–60 (EGIG), claimed to be the first of its kind (Bauer, 1968).
OriginalsprogEngelsk
UdgiverEuropean Geosciences Union
StatusUdgivet - 13 dec. 2019

Publikationsserier

NavnEGU Blogs - Cryospheric Sciences
ForlagEuropean Geosciences Union

Programområde

  • Programområde 5: Natur og klima

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